Limbic Encephalitis

Post prepared by Precious Ramirez-Arao, Monmouth Medical Center PGY3

A 60 year-old female was found lethargic lying in a pool of feces by roommate.

EMS was called and was immediately brought to the hospital.

In the emergency department she had a witnessed generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

Her roommate relates she had episodes of confusion and short-term memory loss over the past few weeks.

She remained lethargic over the next 72 hours in the hospital.

48-hour EEG monitoring showed diffuse 2 to 3 Hz delta slowing with periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges emanating from the left frontal temporal region.

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T2 weighted image of the brain showed signal abnormality of the left mesial temporal lobe and the pulvinar with diffusion restriction in the left hippocampus consistent with limbic encephalitis.

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Limbic encephalitis (LE) is a subacute syndrome of seizures, personality change and cognitive dysfunction, typically evolving over days to weeks.

Autoimmune and paraneoplastic forms have been described. The most common neoplasms associated with paraneoplastic LE are lung cancer (usually small cell), thymoma, ovarian or testicular teratoma, breast cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma. The associated autoantibody depends on the tumor type. Lung cancer and thymomas are associated with anti-VGKC while ovarian or testicular teratomas are associated with antiNMDA antibodies.

Neurologic symptoms can precede oncologic diagnosis for several months to years and initial CT scans are typically unrevealing.

Nevertheless, prompt and thorough evaluation for malignancy including PET and CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis should be initiated. Symptomatic treatment includes corticosteroids, plasmapharesis and intravenous immune globulin.

 

Cardiac and Concussion Screening at Monmouth March 15, 2014

MJM Flyer Spring Screening

Click here to find out more about concussion.

Click here to find out more about concussion screening.

Click here to find out more about the Matthew J Morahan Program at Barnabas Health.

Lytico-Bodig Syndrome, You Might Get it From Eating Bats

Posted by Daniel Rubio, Drexel University College of Medicine Class of 2014

“A man” obsessing over “bats”…

“A man” eating “bats”…


The patients above are displaying symptoms resulting from a disease known as Lytico-Bodig Syndrome (LBS), a neurologic disease resembling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS/Lou Gehrig’s Disease), Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.  The country with the greatest number affected is the US territory of Guam.  In fact, between the 1940-1960 it was the leading cause of death among the Chamorro people, a tribe found on the island of Guam.  The afflicted were usually between the ages of 25-40 years of age.

What’s up with the bats?

Although yet to be proven, it is believed that the high incidence of LBS is due to the consumption of fruit bat, a cultural delicacy on the island.  These fruit bats feed on specific fruits containing high concentrations of an altered amino acid called beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). BMAA is a known neurotoxin and is believed to be the cause of LBS.  BMAA is a protein building block that is incorporated into neuronal proteins to produce an abnormal form that creates clumps with neurons resulting in their dysfunction and death.

I don’t eat bat though?

I addition to the high concentrations found in the fruit bats on the island of Guam, multiple sources have been proposed leading to BMAA exposure within the United States.  Certain bacteria in fresh and salt waters produce BMAA; and, fish and crustaceans will concentrate BMAA within their tissues when they consume the bacteria as part of their normal diet.  It is believed that human consumption of fish and crustaceans in at-risk areas might increase the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Lou Gehrig’s.  This association has been seen in many areas within the United States, especially around the gulf regions and around large bodies of water.  Click here for more details about this.

Am I more lytico or bodig?

Presenting symptoms exist along the continuum of lytico-bodig.  Patients on the lytico spectrum present more like ALS/Lou Gehrig’s disease.  These patients have muscle wasting/atrophy and accompanying weakness, paralysis of mouth and tongue, and an inability to swallow resulting in choking to death.  Over time, paralysis involves the breathing muscles requiring mechanical ventilation to help the patient breath and to prevent choking on secretions.  Lytico patients remain aware of their deterioration.  The form of LBS is fatal in all cases.

On the other end of the spectrum, patients with bodig presentations look more like Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease patients.  Bodig patients present with “freezing” with progressive immobility with loss of starting purposeful movement and loss of spontaneous movement.  Progressive dementia with loss of speech and irrational behavior, including violence and rapid fluctuations in mood, are common.  Over time, patients are left in stiff and immobile postures with inability to speak and swallow.

How would I know if I had LBS?

Currently Lytico-Bodig syndrome is diagnosed based upon appropriate history and physical exam by a neurologist.  Definite LBS is declared in post-mortem autopsy.  However, there is research being done to develop rapid tests using cerebral spinal fluid analysis.

What can I do if I have LBS?

Treatment is mainly supportive as is based upon symptoms present, whether it’s Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, ALS, or a combination of the three spectrums of diseases.   The more the symptoms resemble Lytico, the greater the mortality: in patients with predominantly lytico-type symptoms the disease is practically 100% fatal.

Concussion’s Axis of Evil

The term concussion is derived from the Latin word “concutere” which means “to shake violently”:

This term is used to describe a head injury associated with a temporary loss of brain function, including impaired consciousness, cognitive dysfunction and/or emotional problems.

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Concussion Center

To fully understand Concussion’s Axis of Evil, one need look no further than the brutal world of professional boxing and it’s neurological complications.

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One of the most savage beatings any fighter every received occurred on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio, when 24 year old Jack Dempsey destroyed 37 year old Jess Willard to become the Heavyweight Champion of the World.

One can easily spot the effects of concussion in Willard as he sustains blow after blow to the head, and he develops unsteady gait, erratic behavior (failing to avoid punches and protect himself) and ultimately unconsciousness.

New Jersey’s own Harrison S. Martland MD (1883-1954) was the first to report in 1928 that repeated beatings of this kind could lead to a delayed permanent neurologic syndrome referred to as punch drunk syndrome.

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His observations went largely unheeded.

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Muhammad Ali (born as Cassius Marcellus Clay in 1942) was only 22 when he became word heavyweight champion in 1964, almost 40 years after Martland’s paper was published.

Here is with Liberace in 1964:

Almost 10 years after that performance, Prof Corsellis reported further clinical and pathological features of punch drunk syndrome in his 1973 paper “The Aftermath of Boxing”.
Here’s data from one of his cases:

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By the 1980s, reports of abnormal brain CT scans in professional boxers had reached the popular media (Sports Illustrated, 1983):

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By 1983, Muhammad Ali was retired from professional boxing,

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and soon to be diagnosed with “Parkinson’s disease”.

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Here he is on the Today show with Bryant Gumbel in 1991:

Here he is in 2009:

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Obviously, repeated head trauma, and it’s consequences, is not unique to boxing:

concussion9John Grimsley (1962-2008) was a linebacker for the Houston Oilers.  He retired in 1993.  In 2008, aged 45, he was killed by an accidental gun shout wound to the chest.

His brain was examined as part of an ongoing study by Boston University’s Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

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concussion10His brain showed the same pathologic changes as the Punch Drunk boxers.

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This syndrome, more commonly referred to as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, is now known to have occurred as a consequence of repeated head trauma in many other sports, including soccer, hockey, horse-racing and wrestling.

College football and amateur soccer players have been shown to have impaired performance on neuropsychologic testing, worse with increasing number of concussions.

Then, there’s the Second Impact Syndrome (SIS).

SIS is said to be a rare, often fatal, traumatic brain injury that occurs when a repeat injury is sustained before symptoms of a previous head injury have resolved.
Although limited to single case reports, and disputed as a discrete syndrome in the scientific literature, SIS cases are young athletes and have become high profile in the media:
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Click here to find out more about this case.

It has become clear that it takes athletes longer to recover from repeated that single concussions:
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This data, as well as SIS cases, has led to a concern that the presence of ongoing concussive symptoms are a significant risk factor for further injury to occur, and that any residual symptoms should mandate restriction for further contact sport in young athletes.

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Finally, it is know that concussions are under-reported by high school players.

A 2004 survey of 1500 varsity football payers in Milwaukee disclosed that although 15% had sustained a concussion during the season only 50% reported it to their coach or trainer.

So there we have it, Concussion’s Axis of Evil:

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And the solution?

The Allies Against Concussion:

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Click here to read more about how we have put these measures into effect at Monmouth Neuroscience Institute.

Click here to find out more about the Matthew J. Morahan III Health Assessment Center for athletes at Barnabas Heath.

Playing video games improves aging brain function

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We know from previous blogs that there is an escalating incidence of dementia.

We know that the strongest risk factor for developing dementia is old age.

However, we also know that dementia is not an inevitable consequence of old age.

Why do some older adults get dementia and others don’t?

Instead of looking for dementia risk factors, some researchers have turned the tables on this question, and looking at things that might be protective, reduce the likelihood of age related dementia.

This could translate into activities or behaviors  anyone could use to lower their dementia risk.

For example, regular exercise and social stimulation have been shown to lower dementia risk.

New research published in Nature looks at the relationship between brain function and video games performance in aging adults.

The investigators designed a game called NeuroRacer in which the player drives a virtual car along a track and must respond to the appearance of specific road signs by pressing a button. The trick is that the player has to attend to one type of sign only, ignore the others, and continue “driving” all the while.  Then, as the participants learned the game and improved their scores, the game gets harder and harder.

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The study had 46 participants, aged 60-85, engage in 12 hours of the training over the course of a month. During that time, they vastly improved their performance, and at the end of that study they played just as well as 20-year olds.  Furthermore, these gains in brain function persisted for more than 6-months, and more importantly weren’t limited to gaming – study participants also showed improved attention and working memory.

Click here to find out more.

New cure for dementia?

Probably not.

However, this study does demonstrate that older adults can still re-shape their brain connections, and also re-affirms that the old adage, if you don’t use it you lose it, also includes brain function!
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Maybe it’s time to start playing chess or BrainAge regularly?

Prosopagnosia

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Memo to Hollywood: Don’t take it personally if Brad Pitt has no memory of meeting you. The World War Z actor, 49, apparently has a difficult time recognizing people’s faces. In fact, he thinks he may suffer from prosopagnosia, or face blindness.

Speaking about the problem in his much-talked-about interview for Esquire magazine’s June/July issue, Pitt says that even if he’s had a “real conversation” with someone, he’ll forget what the person looks like almost as soon as he or she walks away. “So many people hate me because they think I’m disrespecting them,” the actor confesses to the mag.

Prosopagnosia is a rare brain disorder that impairs the ability to recognize faces without affecting other aspects of visual processing.  It is usually caused by a lesion affecting the fusiform gyrus such as stroke or head trauma, although there are even rarer congenital cases.

Perhaps the best known case is “Dr. P.” in Oliver Sacks‘ 1985 book The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat:

Dr P. was a musician of distinction, well-known for many years as a singer, and then, at the local School of Music, as a teacher. It was here, in relation to his students, that certain strange problems were first observed. Sometimes a student would present himself, and Dr P. would not recognize him; or, specifically, would not recognize his face. The moment the student spoke, he would be recognized by his voice …….. At first these odd mistakes were laughed off as jokes, not least by Dr P. himself …….. His musical powers were as dazzling as ever; he did not feel ill—he had never felt better ……. The notion of there being ‘something the matter’ did not emerge until some three years later, when diabetes developed. Well aware that diabetes could affect his eyes, Dr P. consulted an ophthalmologist, who took a careful history and examined his eyes closely. ‘There’s nothing the matter with your eyes,’ the doctor concluded. ‘But there is trouble with the visual parts of your brain ……… ‘What seems to be the matter?’ I asked him at length. ‘Nothing that I know of,’ he replied with a smile, ‘but people seem to think there’s something wrong with my eyes.’ ‘But you don’t recognize any visual problems?’ ‘No, not directly, but I occasionally make mistakes.’

Dr P. illustrates another important symptom in cognitive neurology, anosagnosia. Dr P. is himself completely unaware that he has a problem, he compensates without even knowing it.  It is his wife and students that encouraged him to seek medical attention.

Neuromuscular respiratory failure

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Each lung is composed of >300 million tiny membrane bound sacs of air sacs (alveoli) which if spread out would cover a piece of ground roughly the size of a tennis court.  The purpose of this giant membrane is to exchange oxygen from the air for carbon dioxide from the blood stream.

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If the lungs become congested (or filled with fluid) from infection (pneumonia) or heart failure, it becomes harder to extract oxygen from the air:

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Treatment includes adding extra oxygen to the air to make this process more efficient.

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However, gas exchange across the alveoli can only occur if fresh air is brought into the lungs, and stale air is moved out, a process known as ventilation.  The diaphragm and muscles of the chest wall act like a giant bellows to make this happen:

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These muscles can become weak in nerve or muscle diseases such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, polio, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and myasthenia gravis.

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These patients are evaluated by pulmonary function testing, which will usually show a low forced vital capacity, low cough flow, and in advanced cases, elevated end-tidal carbon dioxide level.

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Patients with this type of ventilatory failure do not need extra oxygen, their lungs can extract oxygen from air normally, they need mechanical assistance moving air across their lungs:

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Early neuromuscular respiratory muscle weakness causes nocturnal hypoventilation.  This is because the weakened diaphragm is even more inefficient when laying supine in bed with the stomach contents pressing up on it.

Nocturnal hypoventilation presents with daytime sleepiness, early morning headaches, fatigue, and impaired cognition.

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Click here to take an on-line test, and find out how sleepy you are during the day.  If you score 10 or higher, you might have a problem!

Nocturnal hypoventilation is best treated using a non-invasive respirator at night, either with a face or nose mask:

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Other patients use a negative pressure respirator vest, or cuirass, which requires the patient to wear an upper body shell  attached to a pump which actively controls the respiratory cycle:

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Neuromuscular respiratory failure also leads to an ineffective cough, which in turn predisposes patients to aspiration, retention of secretions, or pneumonia.  Affected patients need to learn to use the cough assist machine when they get a minor respiratory tract infection to help them clear their secretions and prevent pneumonia:

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More severe neuromuscular ventilatory failure leads to rapid shallow breathing, accessory respiratory muscle use, thoracoabdominal paradox (inward motion of the abdomen during inspiration), and ultimately high blood levels of carbon dioxide.

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Thoracoabdominal paradox – Normal (upper) abdomen moves outward with inspiration (diaphragm contraction). NM weakness (lower) abdomen moves in when patient inspires using accessory muscles.

In these cases, respiratory support is needed day and night.

Some patients can continue to use non invasive respiratory support, sleeping with a face or nose mask, and using a mouth piece intermittently during the day:

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Others cannot tolerate noninvasive ventilation or have anatomic abnormalities that preclude fitting of noninvasive ventilators.  Some disease, such as advanced ALS and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, affect the upper airway muscles as well as the diaphragm, impairing swallowing and compromising airway protection from aspiration.  These patients can chose to be managed with invasive respiratory support using a tracheotomy and conventional ventilator.

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Click here and and here to find out more about the management of neuromuscular respiratory failure.

A new kind of stem cell treatment for Parkinson’s Disease?

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First, what is Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by the death of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, leading to neurologic symptoms including tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with walking.  Traditionally a clinical diagnosis, uncertain cases can now be more readily confirmed using a DaTscan.

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Early PD, showing L>R rest tremor, awkward movement of the L hand, rest tremor walking, and increased tone in the L arm:

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More advanced PD, showing stooped posture, rest tremor, slow hesitant gait and difficulty turning, and poor postural reflexes (risk of falls).

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How is it usually treated?

Modern treatments are effective at managing the early motor symptoms of the disease, by:

1. Taking extra dopamine, in the form of the precursor drug L-Dopa,

2. Taking MAO-B or COMT inhibitors, which inhibit the breakdown of dopamine, or

3.  Taking synthetic dopamine agonist drugs, which bypass dopamine, and bind directly to the dopamine receptors.

Patient with moderately severe PD, fist untreated (left panel), then after taking L-Dopa medication (right panel).

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Then what happens?

Unfortunately, as the disease progresses, patients develop motor complications characterized by involuntary movements called dyskinesias and fluctuations in the response to medication.  As this occurs, PD patients a can change from phases with good response to medication and few symptoms (“on” state, center panel in video below), to phases with no response to medication and significant motor symptoms (“off” state, left panel in video below), then to dyskinesias (right panel in video below).  It becomes harder and harder to keep the patient “on” (middle panel) with medical treatment.

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What about surgery for PD?

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery to implant a medical device called a brain pacemaker in to the subthalamanic nucleus or globus pallidus can still be an option for PD patients with significant motor fluctuations, as long as they do not have dementia.

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So, we still need more treatment options! What about stem cells?

Current therapies do improve motor symptoms, but they become less effective with time, and do not address the non-motor features of the disease, including dementia, speech and swallowing difficulties, and the gait/balance problems.

In the hope of finding a better treatment, investigators have been trying to replace dopamine deficiency in the brains of PD patients by introducing embryonic stem cell transplants since the 1980s. Some patients improved, but results were very variable, with many patients showing no benefit, and others developing uncontrolled dyskinesias.

One of the problems is that these foreign transplanted cells are attacked by the PD patient’s immune system. There is also a concern that the implanted embryonic stem cells may undergo a transformation in the PD patient’s brain and grow into cancerous tumors.

However, there’s a brand new study about to start at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla California: 8 PD patients have undergone removal of small patches of their own skin, which have been turned into a new kind of stem cell that acts like embryonic stem cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (IPS), and can then be injected back in to the brain.  The main advantage of IPS cells over embryonic stem cells is that they are less prone to rejection by the patients’ immune systems, because the transplanted cells come from the individuals themselves.

Ultimately, the hope is that implanted the stem cells will replace the degenerated cells in the patients’ brains, and start producing dopamine in a more physiologic way, treating all of the effects of PD without the side effects of oral medications.

Only time will tell if this IPS treatment is effective, or if we need some other stem cell strategy to treat PD.  We do know that a lot of PD patients and their families and friends are waiting with baited breath.

Find out more about the IPS for PD study here.

Find out more about stem cell therapy for PD from the Michael J. Fox Foundation.