Sleep Apnea Treatment Improves Golf Performance!

 

A new study suggests treating obstructive sleep apnea with continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP therapy, improves golf performance in middle-aged men.

 

CPAP
 
Up to six months of CPAP treatment was associated with significant improvements in excessive daytime sleepiness.
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CPAP patients also experienced better quality of life and an 11% drop in their average handicap index.

Among the more skilled golfers with baseline handicaps of 12 or less, the average handicap dropped by 31%.

Patients attributed their enhanced performance to improved concentration, endurance and decision making.

Click here to take an on-line test to see if you might have a sleep disoder.

Click here to find out more about sleep disorders in general.

And find out more about the Comprehensive Sleep Medicine Program at Monmouth Neuroscience Institute.

Monmouth Neuroscience NPH Success Story

ventriculostomy-hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus before (A) and after (B) CSF diversion

Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is caused by excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and enlargement of the brain’s ventricular system, putting increased pressure on surrounding brain tissue, and leading to a distinctive gait disturbance, urinary incontinence and dementia.

NPH can be effectively treated by a surgical procedure to divert the CSF from the ventricles into the peritoneal cavity via a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Early diagnosis and treatment are important for this surgical treatment to be effective.

However NPH is frequently unrecognized or misdiagnosed as arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, or “senility”, leading to other ineffective treatments and nursing home confinement.

However, many patients with dementia or gait problems and large ventricles on a brain imaging study will not improve after shunting.  Performing surgery on all such patients, without further selection, can result in ineffective surgery, and more importantly other potential complications like bleeding around the brain (a subdural hematoma).

Therefore selecting the patients with suspected NPH who are most likely to benefit from surgery is of the utmost importance.  Studies have shown that careful evaluation of patients using objective measures during prolonged CSF drainage via a lumbar drain is the most sensitive and specific way to predict which patients will improve with surgery.

The neurologists and neurosurgeons at the Monmouth Neuroscience Center have developed a multidisciplinary hydrocephalus assessment program to evaluate patients with suspected NPH and determine who is most likely to benefit from a shunting procedure.

Here’s one of out recent success stories!

Find out more about:

Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

Other funny walks and extreme gait apraxia

The Hydrocephalus Program at Monmouth Neuroscience Institute

Extreme Gait Apraxia – Parkinson’s Patient Can’t Walk But Can Ride a Bike!

Apraxia is a disorder of motor planning leading to the loss of ability to carry out a learned purposeful movement, despite having the desire and the physical ability to perform that movements.

For example, patients with dressing apraxia, which can be caused by stroke or dementia, can move their limbs normally, but cannot figure out how to put their clothes on properly:

Patients with gait apraxia, caused by Parkinsonism, NPH or frontal lobe dysfunction, have particular difficulty initiating gait and making turns, often with a tendency to freeze, but a relative preservation of straight-line gait once initiated:

A newspaper article from the UK reported the case of a 58-year-old man with Parkinson’s and severe “gait freezing”. He required visual guides to help him move one foot in front of the other and was unable to turn while walking. After a few steps he would lose his balance and then require his wheelchair.  However, he could still ride his bicycle, flawlessly:

This is extreme gait apraxia – he is able to move his legs and control he balance enough to ride a bike, and yet is unable to do so for the (much easier) task of walking.

Click here to read the full article.

Click here to see more funny walks.