Music Improves Parkinson’s Gait

Post prepared by Quoc-Sy Kinh Nguyen Drexel University College of Medicine Class of 2014

Walking through the park

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1% of people over the age of 60.
It is a clinical diagnosis that requires 2 out of 3 of the following signs: resting tremors, rigidity, and bradykinesia.
Although there is no cure, there are certain medications that can slow down the process: Levodopa is currently the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson’s, but long-term use can lead to levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID), which include chorea, athetosis, and dystonia. This condition is difficult to treat and significantly affects a patient’s quality of life.

Fortunately, once LID has developed, lowering the dosage of levodopa may help. Medications such as amantadine and atypical neuroleptics can also be used to alleviate the symptoms of LID. Though a bit more invasive, deep brain stimulation is another alternative.

Ultimately, LID is caused by chronic levodopa therapy. Therefore, if one can avoid its use or lower the dosage of levodopa while still treating symptoms of Parkinson’s, then this whole ordeal can be circumvented. To avoid developing LID, one can initially take dopamine agonists such as pramipexole to delay the need for levodopa. As the disease progresses, dopamine agonists become less effective, and levodopa must then be introduced. Once it is introduced, taking levodopa at a lower dosage may decrease the risk of developing LID. In practical terms, one must lower the threshold to symptomatic relief of Parkinson’s by levodopa.

In the pilot study “Ambulosono: A Sensorimotor Contingency-Based Musical Walking Program For People Living With Parkinson’s Disease,” researchers aimed to do just that.

They used the accelerometer of the fourth-generation iPod to monitor differences in stride length among Parkinson’s patients tied to a music program.

The patients were told to do long-distance, large-stride walking every day, with the iPod strapped in a pouch above the patients’ knees, connected by wireless headphones. It was set up to have continuous music playback when a certain stride length was reached. The music playlist consisted of musical cues that have reported effectiveness in activating the limbic and other associated motor networks.

The researchers followed 42 patients with Parkinson’s over a period of 320 days with a cumulative walking distance of 3500 km and 700 hours of music playback. They found significant improvements in stride length (10–30%) and walking speed (10–20%), as well as improvements in other functional areas, like arm swinging, facial expression, long-term fear and anxiety of using escalators, and activity avoidance resulting from depression and anxiety.

This novel approach of employing current accessible technology in the functional improvement of Parkinson’s disease reduces the burden linked to taking levodopa. While this is a small study and further investigations are still needed, it provides a different perspective of Parkinson’s treatment that has the potential to greatly improve patients’ quality of life by decreasing exposure to medications and their many side effects.

Recent study links marijuana use to structural brain changes

 

 

Post  prepared by Amanda Baker, Drexel University College of Medicine Class of 2014

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A study recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience by Harvard researchers have linked casual marijuana use to structural changes in distinct areas of the brain.

These areas, the nucleus accumbens and amygdala, and are largely involved in recognition of reward, motivation, fear, and memory.  In this study, the brain scans of 20 young adult casual marijuana users were compared to those of 20 young adult non-users.

While the results clearly demonstrated significant structural differences between the two groups, the structural changes have not been correlated with consequences in mental or physical functioning.  In other words, researchers aren’t entirely sure of the impact of these brain changes.

 

Casual marijuana use may damage your brain

The debate regarding the use of marijuana medically and recreationally is ongoing in the United States.

Although the Drug Enforcement Administration(DEA) categorizes this drug as Schedule I, “with currently no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse”, many argue that there is, in fact, much benefit to medical marijuana, especially in comparison to other sedating pain medications.

This is reflected in 21 state laws which have legalized medical marijuana to varying degrees.

Last summer, Dr. Sanjay Gupta completed a documentary “Weed” highlighting the benefit of medical marijuana:

However, some states such as Washington and Colorado, have gone one step further by legalizing marijuana for both recreational and medical use.

Given the ongoing research on the effects of marijuana, perhaps this new study will call into question continued legalization of the most widely used recreational drug in America.

 

Click here to find out more.

 

Monmouth Neuroscience at the 2014 NJ Stroke Conference

We are happy to report that Monmouth’s stoke program was well represented at the 2014 New Jersey Stroke Conference earlier this month.

Two department of medicine residents, Drs Amor and Chan, presented our TIA center data in the poster session:

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Dr Holland gave a talk on the role of telemedicine in stroke rehabilitation.

Gamma knife tremor patient comes back to get the other side done!

Our first tremor patient treated with gamma knife radiosurgery recently came back, one year later, to have the other side treated.
He has essential tremor, which was affecting both arms.
He had undergone treatment to the left brain for right sided tremor last year.
He was so pleased with his results, he recently came to have the right brain treated to address the left sided tremor.
Here is his most recent video.
Note the action and postural tremor on the left (untreated) side, and the fact that he has almost not residual tremor on the right (treated) side.

Click here to find out more about Gamma knife radiosurgery for tremor at the Monmouth Neuroscience Institute.

Limbic Encephalitis

Post prepared by Precious Ramirez-Arao, Monmouth Medical Center PGY3

A 60 year-old female was found lethargic lying in a pool of feces by roommate.

EMS was called and was immediately brought to the hospital.

In the emergency department she had a witnessed generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

Her roommate relates she had episodes of confusion and short-term memory loss over the past few weeks.

She remained lethargic over the next 72 hours in the hospital.

48-hour EEG monitoring showed diffuse 2 to 3 Hz delta slowing with periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges emanating from the left frontal temporal region.

PLEDS

T2 weighted image of the brain showed signal abnormality of the left mesial temporal lobe and the pulvinar with diffusion restriction in the left hippocampus consistent with limbic encephalitis.

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Limbic encephalitis (LE) is a subacute syndrome of seizures, personality change and cognitive dysfunction, typically evolving over days to weeks.

Autoimmune and paraneoplastic forms have been described. The most common neoplasms associated with paraneoplastic LE are lung cancer (usually small cell), thymoma, ovarian or testicular teratoma, breast cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma. The associated autoantibody depends on the tumor type. Lung cancer and thymomas are associated with anti-VGKC while ovarian or testicular teratomas are associated with antiNMDA antibodies.

Neurologic symptoms can precede oncologic diagnosis for several months to years and initial CT scans are typically unrevealing.

Nevertheless, prompt and thorough evaluation for malignancy including PET and CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis should be initiated. Symptomatic treatment includes corticosteroids, plasmapharesis and intravenous immune globulin.

 

Broca’s Aphasia vs. Aphemia

Aphasia is a disorder of speech an language caused by a strategic brain lesion.

Broca’s aphasia is a non-fluent type of aphasia with preserved comprehension caused by a lesion in the dominant (usually left) frontal lobe.

Broca’s affects both speech and writing. Because comprehension is spared, patients can monitor their own speech and become frustrated.

Affected patients will often find some alternate means of communication, other than speaking or writing, like Breaking Bad’s Hector Salamanca:

Aphemia is similar to Broca’s aphasia, but is caused by smaller lesions such that affected patients cannot speak but can still communicate with writing:

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Aphemia