Monmouth Neuroscience at the 2014 NJ Stroke Conference

We are happy to report that Monmouth’s stoke program was well represented at the 2014 New Jersey Stroke Conference earlier this month.

Two department of medicine residents, Drs Amor and Chan, presented our TIA center data in the poster session:

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Dr Holland gave a talk on the role of telemedicine in stroke rehabilitation.

Gamma knife tremor patient comes back to get the other side done!

Our first tremor patient treated with gamma knife radiosurgery recently came back, one year later, to have the other side treated.
He has essential tremor, which was affecting both arms.
He had undergone treatment to the left brain for right sided tremor last year.
He was so pleased with his results, he recently came to have the right brain treated to address the left sided tremor.
Here is his most recent video.
Note the action and postural tremor on the left (untreated) side, and the fact that he has almost not residual tremor on the right (treated) side.

Click here to find out more about Gamma knife radiosurgery for tremor at the Monmouth Neuroscience Institute.

Limbic Encephalitis

Post prepared by Precious Ramirez-Arao, Monmouth Medical Center PGY3

A 60 year-old female was found lethargic lying in a pool of feces by roommate.

EMS was called and was immediately brought to the hospital.

In the emergency department she had a witnessed generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

Her roommate relates she had episodes of confusion and short-term memory loss over the past few weeks.

She remained lethargic over the next 72 hours in the hospital.

48-hour EEG monitoring showed diffuse 2 to 3 Hz delta slowing with periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges emanating from the left frontal temporal region.

PLEDS

T2 weighted image of the brain showed signal abnormality of the left mesial temporal lobe and the pulvinar with diffusion restriction in the left hippocampus consistent with limbic encephalitis.

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Limbic encephalitis (LE) is a subacute syndrome of seizures, personality change and cognitive dysfunction, typically evolving over days to weeks.

Autoimmune and paraneoplastic forms have been described. The most common neoplasms associated with paraneoplastic LE are lung cancer (usually small cell), thymoma, ovarian or testicular teratoma, breast cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma. The associated autoantibody depends on the tumor type. Lung cancer and thymomas are associated with anti-VGKC while ovarian or testicular teratomas are associated with antiNMDA antibodies.

Neurologic symptoms can precede oncologic diagnosis for several months to years and initial CT scans are typically unrevealing.

Nevertheless, prompt and thorough evaluation for malignancy including PET and CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis should be initiated. Symptomatic treatment includes corticosteroids, plasmapharesis and intravenous immune globulin.

 

Broca’s Aphasia vs. Aphemia

Aphasia is a disorder of speech an language caused by a strategic brain lesion.

Broca’s aphasia is a non-fluent type of aphasia with preserved comprehension caused by a lesion in the dominant (usually left) frontal lobe.

Broca’s affects both speech and writing. Because comprehension is spared, patients can monitor their own speech and become frustrated.

Affected patients will often find some alternate means of communication, other than speaking or writing, like Breaking Bad’s Hector Salamanca:

Aphemia is similar to Broca’s aphasia, but is caused by smaller lesions such that affected patients cannot speak but can still communicate with writing:

Presentation2

 

 

Aphemia